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• NOMINATED FOR PUSHCART PRIZE •
by Atticus Review

Leah is proud to say that her short story, “Music knows no color,” about Frederick Douglass’ violin-playing grandson, Joseph Douglass, playing classical music before a stunned crowd at the Chicago World’s Fair, was nominated by Atticus Review for the legendary Pushcart Prize. For the uninitiated, the Pushcart Prize is an annual anthology compiled by veteran editors who read and review thousands of pieces submitted from editors of other presses. Every press in the world is invited to submit their six best pieces from the calendar year for consideration for the award, and Atticus Review chose to nominate Leah’s story. You can see the nomination announcement HERE and read the story for free online HERE.


• FICTION & POETRY FINALIST •
in the Pen 2 Paper Writing Competition

Leah was a placed finalist in the Coalition of Texans with Disabilities Pen 2 Paper Writing Competition in both the Poetry and the Fiction categories. The award focuses on writing about disabilities (but you don’t have to be a Texan, luckily). Leah’s fiction piece, “Every time it snows,” is about the PTSD and physical disabilities of soldiers after the Civil War, showcasing how war trauma is as old as war itself. That piece is not available to read online. Her finalist poem, “To be happy,” however, is available to read for free online at the awards announcement page. This poem is about the writer Anne Sexton and her then-undiagnosed bipolar disorder that led to her endless struggle for happiness and balance, finally culminating in a devastating suicide that rocked the literary world and changed the way bipolar disorder was treated forever. You can read the announcement and other winners HERE, or go directly to a PDF of Leah’s poem HERE.


Published in Footnote #1

Leah had two pieces published in the literary journal of history, Footnote #1. The first piece, “To the statue of Captain John Riley Parker on Lexington Battle Green Square:” is an epic metered-verse poem about one of her heroes during the Battles of Lexington and Concord, sparking the American Revolution. The second piece, “Small sacrifices,” is a short story about two soldier friends during the Civil War, one who wants to return home to his wife, and one who wants to stay at war so he never has to see his wife again. You can find these pieces alongside over a hundred other pieces of historical writing in the inaugural issue of Footnote, a literary journal dedicated to personal and non-scholarly historical and contemporary views on history told through poetry, maps and historical photographs, fiction, essays, articles, and nonfiction by various authors, both contemporary and historical. Purchase the book in paperback and eBook HERE.


Published in Atticus Review

Leah had a short story, “Music knows no color,” about Frederick Douglass’ violin-playing grandson, Joseph Douglass, playing classical music before a stunned crowd at the Chicago World’s Fair, published in Atticus Review’s Music Issue. You can read the whole Music Issue online for free HERE, or go straight to Leah’s story HERE.